Hannah Interview Full Transcript: 

 

Caroline Gardner  

So, if you don't mind, um, by starting to tell me, like your name, how old you are and then like, what your relationship is to the education system right now.

 

Hannah  

Okay, so, um, my name is Hannah. I am 21 years old. I'm currently a senior at Miami University studying early childhood education. And I am in my student teaching right now, which means that I'm spending all day every day in a second grade classroom at Mason, early childhood Center at in Mason, Ohio. And so I am a student teacher in the sense that I am teaching all day before we went to virtual learning, I was like in charge of the classroom, I was planning I was teaching everything. Now, based on what's happened, I am a cooperating with my co teacher and we've kind of split like half and half so We're both creating lessons. We're both responding to kids. We've kind of split the work in half. I teach all subjects I teach, like math and reading and writing and science and social studies and spelling and all that fun stuff. So, yeah, does that Is that good?

 

Caroline Gardner  

Yeah. Oh my god, you're such a badass all the subjects? Oh, sheesh, I'll edit that too. (side bar- I didn't) Um, so, how, how is it been like planning online lessons?

 

Hannah  

Yeah, so, I was really lucky because, well, I'm lucky for a multitude of reasons. Um, so we were called off the, like a Thursday, and to wine which is the governor of Ohio announced it at like, a two and we get out of school at 330 the kids get on the bus and we're like teaching from two to three. 32 like no one had any idea what was going on? And, and they were like, and we had they told us the day before to, like start getting things together, like, start making packets, if you can, like start trying to think like, we're probably gonna have to go virtual at some point, what are we going to do, but no one thought it would be soon. And so basically they were like that Thursday, they were like, okay, we're done. Like, we're not we're not we have big he called it a spring break. And so everyone was like, what does that mean? Like, does that mean we don't work for three weeks? Like, what are we supposed to be teaching? Like, I had no idea what that meant. So we basically so the kids left and they had absolutely nothing they had didn't have their we were lucky enough to be one to one. So Mason is a, like an upper middle class School District. Incredibly. They're just they have a lot of resources that not all school districts have. And so they we all have Chromebooks and so the goal was to send them all home with Books and charges, but they all the kids left without anything. And so that Friday, they canceled school, and my teacher and I went in and like grab stuff that we could plan with. And we had kids come in to pick up their stuff, like one, like one at a time, because they hadn't closed the building yet. So, um, and then we basically dove into professional learning. So instead of making a start teaching immediately, we did a whole like rollout process, which was great. So the first week, it was all like, here's all this professional learning that you need to do. Here are all these tools here, all these sites that you can use, learn how to use them. And for a lot of teachers who've never had to teach for truly that was huge, because I mean, they have they have no idea how to use like anything like they use their like email, and they're like document cameras. So like them to telling like them to tell it was like it was a disaster. But, um, so we, we had to like, they sued this movie. So the whole week learning how to use stuff. And then the second week, we had a lot of stuff development meetings and collaboration meetings with other teachers. And towards the end of that week, we started, like giving kids small assignments. So like, small things that they're used to doing at school that we would push out and we would send it to them to see just kind of like, how they, how they're, how the technology was working, like how they react. And then the third week started in that was technically like our official rollout of curriculum. So what that looks like right now is that we are, we have lessons that go home. So my kids are second grade so they don't have their they don't have access to their own email yet. They don't have. Some of them have their Chromebooks now. So a lot of them have their own devices that they're using. And they know how to get we have this we use a site called seesaw, which is like our class website. And so they have access to that. So every night at 8pm, the parents get an email with the lessons for the day, the next day, they're supposed to spend two and a half hours every day on work. And then the kids and then the kids get it gets posted on the class website the night before as well. And so yeah, and so they're supposed to do all their assignments, we give them feedback, virtually based on audio messages, or like just typing back. stuff that we do. Twice a week, we do an hour class meeting. It's not required that kids attend, and it's like a Google hangout and they can all see each other and so it's it's not like teaching time in the sense of you don't have like a lesson prepared or anything like that. It's more like we answer questions. And it's more like social in the sense. They just, like miss each other. So it's my favorite is when I like okay, like, anyone have any questions, it's like, I can like yes. And he's like, I lost a tooth and I'm like, that's great. And then he like goes and gets us tooth and,like shows the camera. (Laughs) Thank you. Um, but yeah, like a lot of that stuff like you have a question. Um, it's my dad's birthday. That's great. Like, why does your dad's birthday? Um, so yeah, so it's more that time is more just like connection like, like, they miss seeing their friends. They miss being able to talk to people. So yeah, and yeah, I spend pretty much all day every day planning and I'm only doing half the work. teachers who are teaching so a lot of teachers in our school team teach which means that one teacher teaches like writing and reading And the other teachers like math, science and social studies. And so if if they have two classes that switch in this sense, that means that right now at least you're doing less work because we're only planning for half the, like half the subjects. But if you're teaching all the subjects like that's more, we're lucky in the sense that there's two of us so we can divide it up. But like teachers who are teaching all the subjects by themselves, like they're drowning, like they are working seven to 10 every day, all day constantly, and like, I'm lucky enough that like, I probably work from like, eight to like, four, and that I can take breaks. But that's, I mean, like, that's just me doing half the work and technically, like, I'm not required to be doing it, but I am. So yeah, does. Oh, I'm trying to think there's something else I was gonna say. Um, oh, we're we're also being told that we have To assign half of what we normally do, which makes sense because especially with the problem with especially little kids is that they don't have the computer skills they like can't type they can't, like do any of that. And so like instead of going through store five writing lessons a week I go through to instead of going through, I go through maybe like two writing lessons, maybe three reading lessons. And then like as much science and social studies as I can throw in but that two and a half hours is also taken out by specials, which is doing stuff as well and also if they receive any sort of supplemental instruction, whether that's like reading intervention or like e Ll intervention, anything like that, so we also have to take that into consideration as well. When we're planning

 

Caroline Gardner  

Wow, okay, a I'm writing stuff down on my piece of paper. I'm not like texting while you're talking. I'm be your teacher is So lucky to have you. Oh my god. Was that required by your school to keep doing this? Or is this just a Hannah original.

 

Hannah  

Well, okay, so we're supposed to like we're supposed to cooperate with it. Like we're supposed to help our cooperating teacher and I think everyone's kind of taking that differently. Like, some people are like, peacing out because like, their teacher was like, I gotta handle this. Like, I don't need you. Like, I got it. I got to figure this out. Or some people are just like, I'm interested. And then what we're technically supposed to but I mean, some school districts are, in Ohio, at least are just saying like, we got nothing like we have no idea how to do. And so some people who are still teaching are basically just off. Um, so yeah, I also think I'm in a unique position in the sense that like, I'm working with other teachers who are Obviously are older than me and I have just because I'm younger, I have more like experience with a lot of this technology. So I become like technology help for people. So they'll text me and be like Hannah, how do you upload this? And I'll be like I got you, and we'll go through it. 

 

Caroline Gardner  

Oh my god (laughs). Well, okay, so could you give me an example you were saying that you you're saying on like at the end of week one, I think it was week two, you're giving out some small assignments. As someone who hasn't been to second grade since I was in second grade. Can you tell me a little bit about like, what that looks like, like what the assignment would be for a second grader?

Hannah  

So, um, I'm trying to think. So one of the, I think give you two examples. So basically, the goal of the end of that week was to introduce them to some of the technology that they weren't used to using so we're so we use a lot of technology in the classroom but just based on the nature of this like, like They there was a lot of technology that they had were not accustomed to yet. So like we sent them. There's this website called Raz kids that our school district got a free like trial for because of remote learning. And so like they had to log into Raz kids, they had to read a book. And then there was like a comprehension quiz at the end of the book. So it was just like checking for comprehension. That kind of small like Can they do this? We also one day we had them complete a small like just likes like fluency math practice, like addition, like easy like 10 plus six, like 12 plus two, that's those kind of things. Because then and to get them accustomed to using seesaw for activities where they can like click on a text box and like type in the number. We also have Every Friday in our class, we do Friday friends. So the Friday friend comes to class with three things. And it's like, show and tell. So they share those three things. And all the kids write friendly letters to the Friday friend because they're practicing their letter writing. And then we read the letters, and they answer the questions. It's, it's very pure. It's the cutest thing ever. For me did that that first week, we did Friday friends with one of our kids. And so, like he did share it, he did it. We did a flipgrid. So he shared his video with his flipgrid with his three things that he shared. It was really cute, because he has a baby sister. This is my baby sister. Isn't she so cute? t was adorable. Um, I love it. Anyway. So then then all the kids had to write their letters and then they read it on a flip grid. And then he'd go through and like respond to all the questions. So yeah, those were some of them. 

 

Caroline Gardner  

What is flipgrid?

 

Hannah  

So flipgrid is a cool platform where Teachers can create like a grid, and kids have to respond to some sort of prompt. And like, when we before even we started teaching, we sent them a flip grid just so they could stay engaged with each other. So it was like saying hello. And they could say hello and like, share what they were doing. And then you can respond with videos and they can also put like emojis on the video, which they think is hilarious and like filters. Yeah, so like on this coming week on an on a Wednesday, we're talking about we're talking about wind and so we're using bubbles to like see what how the wind is working. So they're making flipgrid video with their bubbles and like respond to each other. So

 

Caroline Gardner  

Oh my God, that's awesome. That is so creative. I love that. So how involved you would you say parents are in this elearning process?

 

Yeah, so Um, I mean, it depends on the parent. So I have some kids whose parents are, like sitting with them and like making sure they get all their work done. I mean, we've told them that the goal is that they're independent and that their child can do their work by themselves. But obviously, like, that's, some kids like need a lot of redirection, like they need redirection in the classroom. (Hello, I'm on the phone. That's my dad- Laughs) . Um, and, and so. Yeah, so what's interesting is that some parents are sitting, I know that they're sitting there because their child is turning into work that I haven't ever seen from them. And so I know that there's their parent is like, okay, let's rephrase the sentence. That's like, let's Where's your punctuation like, all that kind of stuff?

 

What's your- 

 

Hannah  

My kids are little. So a lot of times they need a lot of that, that prompting. I mean, and some of them, I know that some of them are self motivated, and they get on and they like, do all their stuff and like some of them, I don't see their work for days, and then all of a sudden they do all it. So,

 

Caroline Gardner  

yeah. What is your, like, analysis of whether that's good or that's bad to have the parents? They're like, what's kind of your take on that or not have their parents there?

 

Hannah  

Yeah, so Okay,that's a good question. Um, I think I have a unique perspective because like, I'm not a parent. So I, a lot of my teachers, I work with our parents and like, they see it very much through a parent perspective in the sense that like, they're overwhelmed, and I am 100 and like, parents are so overwhelmed and I don't want them sitting there with their child. Because of that. I don't think that necessarily affects their academic performance. As long as they're not sitting there giving them the answers, which I don't think any parent would, unless it's like, this is miserable, let's just get through this, which is possible. Because having one on one instruction is always going to benefit a child. Like, I don't like the sense that parents feel like they have to do that because they don't want them to because they, their child should be able to do this work independently. Um, but also, like, if the parent is laid off, or they're not working, and they want to sit there and work with their child, like, by all means, like, I am happy for you to help them. Um, like, personally, for me as a teacher, like, I don't really care either way, like, because they're learning as much as they can right now. I'm like, they don't want parents to have to sit there. And I and I don't think they should. If they are really, really, really overwhelmed, but if they are, I'm not mad about it. So make sense.

 

Caroline Gardner  

Um, so what percent of your students? So would you say like 100% of your students have access to a computer, the internet, either by their Chromebooks or from their parents or older siblings or someone's technology?

 

Hannah  

So that's a good question. Um, I have seen all of all of my students have turned in work at this point. Um, that is kind of a new development. There were some still kids. Yeah, it was it was a big deal. There were some kids that like I we still had not seen. I know that they all have access to the internet. I don't know who all has, like their own device in the sense that they can like, like their parents aren't working on, you know what I mean? I think a lot of them do because our school district arranged like Chromebook pickups, so parents can come pick up Chromebooks. And I have we've tried to do a lot of like parent reach out in the sense, like, if you don't have that, like we can help you. Because our school districts like really lucky in a sense that they have the ability to give those to families for right now. So yeah, I think 100% have access to internet and I am pretty sure most of them have their own devices, but I'm not 100% sure on them because they might be sharing with siblings or something like that.

 

Caroline Gardner  

Yeah, that makes sense. So I only have a few more questions. So I stopped me 

 

Hannah  

No you're good, I love talking about this.

 

Caroline Gardner  

Okay, because I do too, 

 

Hannah  

This is what I do all day every day.

Caroline Gardner  

Okay, great. I'm so interested. So just this is great. 

 

Hannah  

Yeah. 

 

Caroline Gardner  

Um, um, so my next question is like, have any of your student like, this might sound super out of touch, but do your students like that? understand what's going on. They're like, what? Seven or eight, right? in second grade?

 

Hannah  

There's seven or eight. Well, they're six or seven, six or seven.

Caroline Gardner  

Yeah. Do they understand then? Like, have they expressed like, worry to you? Like, how do they kind of communicate about this like, huge global issue?

 

Hannah  

So that's a really good question. So yeah, actually, my students are seven, eight. I don't know why I said six to seven for some reason. I was thinking first grade. So they, so it hadn't come up. yet. It but it came up last week on our on our, like, connect time on Google Hangout. And okay, actually, it came up before that. So I had a student, because we had like, two, three weeks where they weren't receiving instruction for us. And so the parents were just kind of like, what do we do? and so I had a child A Google slide on the Coronavirus and posted on our class page. And like none of the other kids could see it, but it was really cute. And we actually talked about it like before they left and there was definitely some anxiety because they're hearing lots of different things from their parents from media that they consume. And there was some anxiety before we left. And then when we left, it wasn't really the virus, it was more of the like, lack of schedule, like kids on age thrive on the schedule, and then they want to know exactly when everything like they want to know when they're going back to normal. When are they going back to school? All these kind of things and the answers of like, we don't know yet. We just have to wait like those don't really fly. And But anyway, so last Thursday, it came up on our Google Hangout call and they were like, Talking about how they're worried. They're, they're worried about their grandparents because they've been told that like, older people are more likely to be affected. And they're worried. If they bring it up, they're worried about like, not being able to go to the park or not being able to see their friends like that kind of like the stuff that affects them directly. But I had a girl, she was literally like, Okay, um, this would house it says that there's a peak in the graph, and I don't know what that means because we haven't like done graphing yet. So they don't even know what a graph is.

Unknown Speaker  

It's not like

 

Hannah  

and I my cooperating teacher ended up talking to her about it and she didn't really she just kind of avoided that question and we're talking about like, we just don't know, like, we have to stay safe, which wash your hands, that kind of stuff. Um, I've been trying to so We last week we started like full instruction and writing is just a struggle with kids like no matter what I hate teaching writing heartache, just because like, they don't like they don't have like the fine motor skills all the way so it's just kind of it's hard. Um, and so the I want to like ease us into it and so we did like a journal so we journal every day about how we were feeling and why this was different than it was before and so I read some of those entries and like some of the kids were talking more about like I miss my friends like I want to go back to school. I want to see like my grandma I want to see my cousin's and then other people were more like, like some of my other kids were more like, this is like why is this happening? This is scary. So they're, they're aware they don't get it totally, but they're definitely like dealing with it. In a in like the way they came But, yeah.

 

Caroline Gardner  

Wow. Yeah, that's crazy. That's just like really? Yeah, sorry. Go ahead.

 

Hannah  

No, I just, I, it's a hard line because I don't want to. Like I want to talk about it with them in the sense that like, I think it's important for them to be able to talk about it. And it's hard because I don't have control over the narrative because I'm not in charge. So because I think it's important to be honest with them, and I'm not in a scary way like I don't, I'm not gonna be like, this is really, really bad. Like, but like, I think it's important to like, tell the truth and to safe, tell them what's happening. Um, I'm not gonna bring it up if they don't want to talk about it, but I yeah, but it's definitely interesting.

 

Caroline Gardner  

So this is something I've been asking like, all the time. teachers that I've been talking to like, I feel like teachers, especially kind of like, take in the stress of their students. And I know it's different because your students are so young, but like, what are you doing to kind of like, take care of yourself during this time, like to not get overwhelmed or like, how are you and what are you doing to like, be okay with everything? If you are?

Hannah  

Yeah, no. So a lot of my stress, my stress with my kids is not necessarily like it's more like, financial insecurity and like, I don't know what's happening at home and like, I don't see them. I can't, like talk to them. Like, if I'm talking to them, there's like a correct like, it's like a lack of, I know, some of them aren't always like happy. So like, how can I like that? I'm not there, and I can't be there. And I mean, it's stressful in the fact that I mean, yeah, it's stressful and it sucks. Um I think I'm dealing with it Okay, I think the fact that there's another person like I think if it was just to me and 27 kids I and it was like I was the only one who was like talking to them and I was the only one who was like, there I think would be a lot harder but I have my cooperating teacher and so like, when something comes up, or we're anxious about someone like we can deal with it together. And also like for like, a lot of those issues, parents are gonna go to her first so when I'm, I'm there and I'm hearing about stuff but like, I she always like, because there's like another person she I always can go to her. But for me, like, I also think that I have to set myself at some point because because it's all virtual, like I can constantly be responding to kids, I can constantly be working if I wanted to. So like, I have to take a step back, and I have to say, okay, like, I will work from this time to this time, and then I'm going to go like, I'm going to run like, I'm going to go make dinner with my family, like I'm data separate from it. Because, like, I just have to make a very, like clear line for myself or I will just like get sucked in and only do school. Yeah,

 

Caroline Gardner  

yeah, no, that's super important. I'm glad you're doing that. Um, so I have like, a last like, lot to two more questions, but that's okay. Okay, so, okay, my first question is, how do you think this is gonna affect your students? Like, educational trajectory? I know that's like a huge question, but are you concerned for how they're going to be in third grade or like how you know You would you say you're covering the same amount of material? No, because you're only doing half the lessons. Right? So, yeah, yeah. So what do you think this looks for? For, like, the education system as a whole one like your students specifically?

 

Hannah  

Yeah. So, um, I mean, I think the general consensus with like, every teacher I've ever talked to, is that they're going to be behind, um, especially younger kids, like, you typically you, you lose like, a quarter of the year over summer. So yeah, so like, when second graders start, they're more like, March 1 graders. And so it's gonna be like, like, I think another quarter of the year, probably gone. I mean, hopefully not as drastic as that but it's gonna be a sense of people are just not going to be where they need to be. So that's going to change The whole, like, expectations and how we teach and like what that means. And that's concerning. I am concerned about the fact that it's, I mean, this is just a huge, like, equity difference, like some kids are their parents, they're really self motivated, or their parents really get on them to do all their work. And so they're going to be reading a lot, they're going to be writing a lot, they're going to be doing all this work even through summer, and they're probably going to be okay. And there's going to be kids who don't receive the support they need at home and are not, don't have the resources that they need at home and are just are just going to be significantly more behind. So I think it's not even going to be like a grade level it's going to be struggling. I think the gap between kids within a grade is going to be larger as well. In like my own cell phone way that I, my whole like job search process is like all screwed up because of this, but I'm like, if I have my own classroom next year like that, I'm going to not only be teaching for the first time, but I'm also gonna be teaching a totally different group of kids that I would have ever taught. So yeah, I mean, it's, it's really concerning, especially because in Ohio, they're gonna have to fix this, or they're gonna have to do something I don't know that I do. But, um, Ohio has something called the third grade reading guarantee. And basically, if you don't pass this test at the beginning of the you have two chances to pass it. You don't pass it, and you don't have an excuse to get retained, which is, in my opinion, a horrible horrible idea and a horrible policy, but like, kids will get retained to third grade if they don't pass this reading test. And so, especially second grade going into third grade, if you're already so good. behind it, you're supposed to pass a third grade reading guarantee. Like, I don't know, I don't know if they're gonna do because it's not that's not a it's like a whole statewide issue so I think they're gonna have to rework that like statewide But yeah, I mean it's it's scary but I saw this really and it's sad because like this is the best time of the year for anyone like it's the best time of the year for college students best time of the year for kids like they're gonna miss field day and like, and like March is like really when we like get it go and like we're gonna like really do a deep dive and we're just not gonna have that but um, they shoot I totally lost my train of thought. But yeah, I mean, they're gonna it's, it's gonna be interesting for sure. Oh, no, I was gonna say I saw this thing that it was like it was like our like assistant principal tweeted it out and it was basically like, okay, like we were talking about how these kids are going to be all over. So behind but like, we have to remember that we have to think about it. Like, there's something that they're gaining, like, they're going to be more flexible. They're going to have links to this historical moment, they're going to be like, you know, like, what, what are the benefits of having to learn through this? And what does that mean? And what does that look like? So, I thought that was interesting.

 

Caroline Gardner  

No, that's like, I literally just got chills. That's so like, smart. I love that. Yeah. Cuz, yeah, I mean, that's a really good way to look at it, I guess.

 

Hannah  

I think so too. And I, I have to, like remind myself, and I also think, if I think about how, like, behind there supposed to be that puts so much pressure on us right now because like, like, I'm teaching and I'm like trying but like, frankly, this is a wash. Like, I can give them as many experiences I can and I'm trying to make it relevant and valuable and try to keep them engaged in their brains moving but it cannot expect that they're going to learn everything they're, like, required to learn. And so how can I use this experience to give them what they need, and help them process without, like being so worried about, like, what standards we're not meeting or any of them? You know, what is your job search look like? And we can do next question if you don't want to get into it.

 

Oh, no, it's so so. So, um, we still like this is like March, April is like primetime, and that's when jobs start being posted for education. And so a lot of school districts, the people who are in charge of posting jobs are also in charge of COVID-19 response plans, and so they're a little busy. Um, and and the problem is, is that like, so now it's focused on us and then also like, I was supposed to I just I mean, I'm not in Ohio. So that's like another thing to where I don't have.

 

Caroline Gardner  

Are you trying to teach in Ohio?

 

Hannah  

Yeah, I think so at least for the first couple of years, just so I don't have to transfer my license or anything like that. But ya know, so. So like I'm applying. And so it's like virtual interviews. But the problem is, is that we so Ohio, like, my hidden like voting, they're like the primary day was of all these school levies were supposed to be passed. So a school levy like, so it would be an extra property tax for like, so like Carmel could pass a levy and then that would mean more money would go to the schools. And so that affects the budget for the schools so that affects who they can hire and what they can hire. And so that's been pushed back till June. And so some school districts don't even know who they can Hire yet and also like some people thought they could retire now they can't. So

 

Caroline Gardner  

Could you imagine?  Oh my god, right, like one more year. They're like no no

 

Hannah  

Yeah, it's really it's a it's it's very stressful I know it's gonna be stressful no matter what so I don't really know why I'm complaining but um, yea. The good thing is that was that if we are virtual still in fall, I could be like, you know what, I've done it

Caroline Gardner  

you could have just yeeted but you didn't that because the Hannah that I know has never yeeted from anything. Um, okay, last question. What are... So do students have this is gonna sound really stupid, but do students have like, learning disabilities in second grade? Like, are you able to like identify that kind of stuff like students who learn differently or maybe are like not did it To have a learning differences, right? That's what, that's the better term.

 

Hannah  

We depend on the school districts we, yeah. And who like what, who you're talking to about what the correct like, term is, but yeah, learning disabilities is fine.

 

Caroline Gardner  

So do you have like, Are there students who are learning with those challenges? As like seven or eight year olds? Or does that come about later? Like, what are you guys doing for the students? So that kind of how does that work? 

 

Hannah  

Yeah. So, um, the second grade is not typically is typically when kids get first and second grade is when kids get flagged in the sense of like, okay, like, maybe this is something we need to watch out for, like we're not performing and where we need to be. So yeah, so kids starting to get flagged, a lot of times they're not diagnosed with a formal diagnosis. Until the end of second grade, starting in the third grade. Um, so with a few exceptions, so when we're talking about like specific learning to a student with a specific learning disability, like, for example, like dyslexia, that will get diagnosed a lot later. However, we still have kids receiving support, if they are not if their data is below where it needs to be on like reading tests, so we have students who we have for students who receive reading instruction, once a day for 40 minutes every day. That's pretty and we have another student who receives it every day, 40 minutes a day as well, but hers is one on one. So that's some pretty intense reading instruction. And those teachers are supposed to be Reaching out to those students in an intervention setting and risk giving them work and working with them. Um, and I, they are doing that when we talk about stuff that isn't reading specifics. So, like normally, when we're teaching like we differentiate, so we are trying to make sure we hit all kids at all levels, and we do pull out groups and we do like so like, for example, let's say we're learning about we're doing like we're writing in a persuasive piece. And I have a group of students who just really struggle with finding evidence. And so I would pull them and we would do like a whole like mini workshop on writing on finding evidence or whatever. That stuff like that kind of pulls small group instruction that happens very regularly in math and in all these different things like is not happening right now. If students receive services through another teacher, it's happening, but like any sort of differentiation that we do in the classroom is really hard to do right now. Because like, we're just trying to stay afloat teaching everyone. Um, I mean, there's some programs that will will help kids like at their level, like they'll test them and then now it's like self directed and they work with them. Um, but yeah, so what's hard right now is that we're trying to make things good, like, try to reach everyone, which is hard. So, yeah, a lot of that intervention one on one is gone unless they have a diagnosis and really receive services. And there are kids in my class who don't receive services who need that, like that pullout instruction. And they're not necessarily getting it right now.

Caroline Gardner  

Think it's difficult? Yeah. I know sounds really stressful for you as a teacher, them as a student, the parent, like, there's no winners in that situation.

 

Hannah  

So we, we sent out a parent survey. Because we're supposed to like check in every week and which is good. And like, some parents were like, yeah, it's fine. And the kids, the parents whose kids like struggling my class, typically, we're like, oh my gosh, it's like pulling teeth. And I'm like, Oh, I'm so sorry. Because I can offer support, but like, there's, it's not like I can sit there with them. And I can like try to give them different things to do. But also like I'm trying to manage 25 other kids. I'm also only doing half the work so I just genuinely don't know how you do it. It's all of you.

 

Caroline Gardner  

Yeah. That's insane. Last question I promise. Is there anything I missed about - like anything that is missing from the picture of education, Hannah's life, your students?

 

Hannah  

Um, I don't think so. I just think at the beginning, like everything was contantantly changing, so we're just starting to find our groove so I really do think we kind of lost a month with the whole transition. And so now I think we're actully learning and we're doing some cool stuff and I'm excited about it but it's not even that we're virtual, it's like we all had to adjust. And I think that's okay and we are allowed to give ourselves grace and say like it is going to happen and that's fine, but like, the world was in chaos and so was education. 

 

Caroline Gardner  

Yeah. Well thank you so much Hannah you're the best. It was so great to talk to you... I'm literally so inspired. Talk soon. 

© 2020 Dr. Ananya Chakravarti

Thanks to Rajeev Kozhikattuthodi for his help in building this website.

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